Radio show – LKRLT http://lkrlt.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 19:13:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lkrlt.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-11-150x150.png Radio show – LKRLT http://lkrlt.org/ 32 32 Loren McGinnis leaves CBC’s Trailbreaker radio show https://lkrlt.org/loren-mcginnis-leaves-cbcs-trailbreaker-radio-show/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 15:59:24 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/loren-mcginnis-leaves-cbcs-trailbreaker-radio-show/ Loren McGinnis is stepping down as host of CBC North’s morning radio show The Trailbreaker after nine years. McGinnis moved to Calgary, where he hosted the local CBC’s Calgary Eyeopener morning show. He joined CBC North as a reporter in 2007. “It was our family’s decision. It didn’t settle, in many ways,” McGinnis told Cabin […]]]>

Loren McGinnis is stepping down as host of CBC North’s morning radio show The Trailbreaker after nine years.

McGinnis moved to Calgary, where he hosted the local CBC’s Calgary Eyeopener morning show. He joined CBC North as a reporter in 2007.

“It was our family’s decision. It didn’t settle, in many ways,” McGinnis told Cabin Radio.

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“It’s a cliché to say a mixture of emotions. I feel overwhelming excitement at the idea of ​​having this opportunity and going on a family adventure to a new part of the country… but it’s really hard to think about leaving.

McGinnis said his relationship with Northern audiences was like “a whole bunch of friendships”.

“It may not be the most professional characterization as a journalist speaking about the communities and people we serve, but I felt so much care from people here, and I also feel it for them. A caring and trusting friendship,” he said.

News of his departure was announced by the CBC on Wednesday. His final show from the Yellowknife studio will air Dec. 9 before appearing on Calgary Eyeopener starting Dec. 12. McGinnis replaces longtime Calgary host David Gray, who retired in June.

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The Trailbreaker is CBC’s flagship program in the Northwest Territories, northern Alberta and western Nunavut.

Most recently, McGinnis won a Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA) award for a show he anchored live from a “tent city” of flood victims in Fort Simpson last year.

Beyond his on-air work, McGinnis has performed as a comedian at stand-up events in the North – he anchored Knife Knews, a short-lived video satire – and appeared as a entertainer at the Folk on the Rocks music festival in Yellowknife.

A Trailbreaker replacement host has yet to be announced.

Speaking on Wednesday’s Calgary Eyeopener, McGinnis drew a similarity between the show’s connection to Calgary residents and the connection he enjoys in the North.

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“It’s a big geographic space, but a small audience,” he said of broadcasting in the Northwest Territories.

“I feel like I know so much. Everywhere I go people say hello.

“Honestly, I experienced that in Calgary. I wouldn’t have known what to expect regarding the relationship between the show and the city until I got there, but everywhere I went, people had something to say.

He told Cabin Radio: “It’s very emotional to think back from here and say thank you and goodbye to our audience, community and friends here, but I’m, of course, very excited about this. opportunity.”

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PowPAC’s Holiday Musical Over Radio Show Features Sound Effects Challenges https://lkrlt.org/powpacs-holiday-musical-over-radio-show-features-sound-effects-challenges/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 19:15:35 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/powpacs-holiday-musical-over-radio-show-features-sound-effects-challenges/ When sound effects are needed in theater productions, shows may use recordings found on the Internet. But back when radio was the main source of entertainment, sound artists had to create everything from slamming doors to footsteps in the snow. These specialists took everyday objects and used them creatively to produce all kinds of sounds. […]]]>

When sound effects are needed in theater productions, shows may use recordings found on the Internet.

But back when radio was the main source of entertainment, sound artists had to create everything from slamming doors to footsteps in the snow. These specialists took everyday objects and used them creatively to produce all kinds of sounds.

These days, creating non-computer generated sound effects could be considered a dying art. But William Rickman not only learned to be a Foley sound designer in the 1940s, but teaches the art to another in “A 1940s Holiday Christmas Carol,” PowPAC’s holiday musical that opens Friday and runs until to December 18.

The show is a play within a play. Set on Christmas Eve 1943 in Newark, New Jersey, it focuses on the Feddington players as they play their version of Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”. The two-act musical explores the chaos and madness of creating a live radio show.

Foley is named after Jack Foley, a sound effects artist who developed many of the sound effects techniques used in film. His pioneering work dates back to the 1920s, the beginnings of sound cinema.

“I started in 2016 … when a friend in another radio room asked me if I was interested in Foley Live,” Rickman said. “I had never done it before and thought I would give it a try.”

Few in the area specialize not only in creating sound effects, but also in front of an audience using techniques from 80 to 100 years ago, Rickman said. He had to do a lot of research.

“It’s a dying art because a lot of people prefer to do it electronically. It’s easier because of the availability on the internet,” he said.

The La Mesa resident served as the Foley designer for five theatrical shows, often because a radio show is part of the plot. This is the first time that Rickman is not also the actor who creates the sound effects on stage.

“The character is in my twenties and I’m 54, so I can’t pull it off,” he said. “But it was an honor to teach someone how to do it. It was great fun.

His student is John Thompson, who plays noisemaker Isador “Buzz” Crenshaw.

This is the first PowPAC show for Thompson, 32, of Carlsbad. He heard about community theater from director Kelli Harless when they were in a production of Patio Playhouse in Escondido.

“The role (of artist Foley) was the only one I was interested in,” Thompson said. “For the other roles, they were looking for singers and I’m not a confident singer.

“I knew it would be a challenge, but I felt like it was interesting,” he added.

Actor John Thompson, whose character is a Foley artist, with Foley designer William Rickman and the Foley Rickman station created for PowPAC’s production of ‘A 1940s Holiday Christmas Carol’.

(Steve Murdock)

Having never seen a stage show with Foley incorporated, this was a new experience for Thompson. He said Rickman’s tutelage has been extremely valuable.

“He provided most of the tools that I use in my performances,” he said. “It was important that he shared his thought process.”

Rickman created the Foley station that Thompson uses on stage. As he set it up so that all the necessary props were within easy reach, he would ask Thompson to move the props around so they were in more comfortable places for him to create the sounds. Rickman compared it to being a chef setting up kitchen utensils in the most convenient way before cooking.

Thompson said he was surprised by some of the props. For example, a can of cornstarch, when pressed near a microphone, sounds like footsteps in the snow. A hinge attached to a board can make the sound of a creaking door.

While Thompson’s character is responsible for creating all the sound for the radio show portion of the musical, he relates to the other cast and also delivers an emotional message near the end.

“(Buzz) is a versatile character,” Thompson said.

Thompson’s training was not Rickman’s sole responsibility.

“The biggest challenge was trying to figure out how to create sound effects in a practical way,” Rickman said.

He can’t use anything that existed after 1943, so the plastic items he finds at a home improvement store are out.

“Everything on the stage should look the way it’s supposed to be there and be functional,” Rickman said. “I had to do a ton of research.”

Rickman said the play’s script gives ideas for creating some of the necessary sounds and when they should occur, but doesn’t say how to actually do it. He has some Foley props he’s used in previous shows, but there were some he had to create for this show.

“There was a lot of trial and error, which adds to the challenge and makes it fun,” Rickman said. “Design is a challenge that pushes you to think about something…it’s an enjoyable challenge.”

“An effect is for a window to break,” he said. “But we can’t have broken glass on stage. Typically, you use a crash box, where you smash windows inside a box. But there is a safety factor here.

How the sound of the window breaking is created is something Rickman declined to share ahead of time, so as not to spoil the surprise for the audience. However, he said it had nothing to do with the glass.

The cast of

The cast of PowPAC’s “A 1940s Holiday Christmas Carol.” The musical can be seen from November 18 to December 18 in Poway.

(Steve Murdock)

This is the first PowPAC production for director Harless. She has many friends who have been involved with PowPAC, which is how she got tapped for this holiday show.

The Escondido resident said she got into theater building sets, which led to her acting, directing and producing.

“By being an actor, I’m a better director, and by being a director, I’m a better actor,” Harless said. “It’s all part of the process. What is important is that I learn, grow and develop my craft.

Although this is her first time leading this show, she staged a play on a radio show. Before television, radio was people’s “lifeline,” she says. He provided them with entertainment and news, especially in times of war.

Harless said she cast Thompson as artist Foley because she saw how meticulous he was when he did lighting work on other shows, and she knew he would be. Ready to take the challenge.

“It’s his first time and he’s doing an amazing job,” she said.

The cast also includes Steve Murdock, Geoffrey Graeme, James Schlarmann, Brian P. Evans, Cody Dupree, Jamie Feinstein, Melanie Mino, Ruth Russell, Emily Awkerman (the live pianist and musical director of the show), Alli Brown and Bart Schilawski.

“A 1940s Radio Christmas Carol” can be seen at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays from November 18 through December 18. There will also be broadcasts at 2 p.m. on Saturdays on December 3 and 17. weekend.

Tickets are $28 for general admission and $25 for seniors (60+), students, and active duty military. Group tickets for 10 or more people are $23 each. Shop at powpac.org or contact the box office at 858-679-8085 or boxoffice@powpac.org.

The PowPAC Theater is on the second level of the Lively Center, 13250 Poway Road in Poway. For those who don’t want to take the stairs, an elevator is at the back. Parking is free.

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Joni Taylor’s Radio Show Returns to Rudy’s BBQ Tuesday – Texas A&M Athletics https://lkrlt.org/joni-taylors-radio-show-returns-to-rudys-bbq-tuesday-texas-am-athletics/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 17:50:40 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/joni-taylors-radio-show-returns-to-rudys-bbq-tuesday-texas-am-athletics/ History links BRYAN-COLLEGE STATION, Texas – The Joni Taylor Radio Show returns to Rudy’s Country Store & Bar-BQ for its second episode Tuesday at 6 p.m. with host Steve Miller on The Zone 1150 AM/93.7 FM. Previously airing on Mondays, the show will now move to Tuesdays for the remainder of […]]]>

BRYAN-COLLEGE STATION, Texas – The Joni Taylor Radio Show returns to Rudy’s Country Store & Bar-BQ for its second episode Tuesday at 6 p.m. with host Steve Miller on The Zone 1150 AM/93.7 FM.

Previously airing on Mondays, the show will now move to Tuesdays for the remainder of the season. Taylor and Miller will discuss the start of the season where the Aggies opened the year with a 2-0 record. The pair will also preview the next game during Duke and Taylor’s inaugural recruiting class, highlighted by three of the top 100 players with special guests.

Rudy’s BBQ is located at 504 Harvey Rd, College Station, TX 77840. Fans who can’t attend can also tune in on the 12th Man mobile app, watch live on the women’s basketball Facebook page or on the 12th Man TV app (available on Apple TV, Roku or Fire Stick).

New season ticket purchases for the 2022-23 Texas A&M women’s basketball season are on sale through the 12th Man Foundation.

Joni Taylor View full schedule Tuesdays at 6 p.m.

  • November 15
  • December 13
  • January 3
  • January 10
  • January 24
  • January 31
  • February 7
  • February 14th
  • the 21st of February
  • February 28
  • March 7

Follow the Aggies
Visit for more information on Texas A&M women’s basketball. Fans can keep up to date with the A&M Women’s Basketball Team on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter by following @AggieWBB.

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Good news at the center of the radio show https://lkrlt.org/good-news-at-the-center-of-the-radio-show/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 19:41:09 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/good-news-at-the-center-of-the-radio-show/ Wayne Netzler, left, and Chuck Reynolds host Good News Waupaca on FM 96.3. Photo submitted The city and Rotary collaborate on the program By Robert Cloud Down the hall from the council chambers, the Waupaca City Radio Station is crammed into two small rooms. In addition to WIN TV, the city’s community media broadcasts live […]]]>

Wayne Netzler, left, and Chuck Reynolds host Good News Waupaca on FM 96.3. Photo submitted

The city and Rotary collaborate on the program

By Robert Cloud

Down the hall from the council chambers, the Waupaca City Radio Station is crammed into two small rooms.

In addition to WIN TV, the city’s community media broadcasts live city council meetings, videos from the library, programs from Winchester Academy and the Waupaca Historical Society, performances by local bands, and special events.

From 9 to 10 a.m. on the first and third Wednesdays of the month, Waupaca Radio FM 96.3 broadcasts Good News Waupaca.

Wayne Netzler, who is on Waupaca Radio from 9 a.m. to noon every Wednesday, and Chuck Reynolds, president of the Waupaca Rotary Club, host the show.

They interview guests who talk about local opportunities for volunteering and contributing to the community.

Recent guests have included Tara Roberts-Turner, who spoke about her experience at the White House Conference on Nutrition, Hunger and Health, Steve Johnson and Mary Zimmerman of the Waupaca Area Community Foundation, and Fred Silloway with Friends at Hartman Creek State Park, among others.

Post on good news

On November 2, the show featured Waupaca County Post editor Robert Cloud and reporter James Card.

Almost every show features Reynolds and Netzler sharing positive news headlines from the Waupaca County Post this week.

Good News Waupaca aired its first show on June 1. Guests included Bob Adams from Foundations for Living, Laura Colbert from the Arts Hub, Sue Abrahamson from the library and Tracy Behrendt from the Waupaca Area Historical Society.

Sponsored by the Rotary Club, the show’s goal is to build goodwill in the community.

Each show is posted on the city’s website and on the Waupaca Good News and Waupaca Radio FM 96.3 Facebook pages.

“Josh Werner is the catalyst for the show,” Netzler said, noting that city media staff had discussed the concept for the show, but it had been “put on the back burner for a while due to from covid”.

Werner is the city’s director of IT and community media.

Netzler said Reynolds got involved and “between the three of us it was bam! and we got the Waupaca Good News.

A lifelong love for music is what brought Netzler to radio.

He graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh in 1992, majoring in radio, television, and film.

Her career, however, shifted to record stores and concert halls.

He started working in Atlantic City, then in Las Vegas for House of Blues, a chain of concert halls and restaurants.

In 2010 Netzler returned to Wisconsin and moved to Waupaca where he had family.

“I went back to UW-Oshkosh for a year to catch up on technology,” Netzler said. “I went back to what I originally planned to do when I was younger.”

Netzler said his favorite part of the show was the people.

“Everyone’s life is a canvas,” Netzler said. “People are more interesting than events.”

He noted that he learns something new on every show.

“I hope listeners get that feeling and I hope they enjoy it,” Netzler said.

Reynolds said the idea for Good News Waupaca came about around the same time that the Rotary Club was “promoting peace in our community.”

Good things in community

“It’s easy for people, because of their phones, to focus on distant things,” Reynolds said. “It is important to know what is going well in your own community.

At its meetings, Rotary has guest speakers who talk about their organizations and what they do for the community.

“I had this idea for a program that would give them a platform,” Reynolds said. “I brought this idea to Josh Werner. He said they were working on the same idea.

Reynolds said he, Werner and Netzler “had a few meetings and talked about how it would work.”

For Reynolds, the show represents every opportunity for local residents to get involved in their community,

“We just moved here full-time about 3 1/2 years ago from the St. Louis area,” Reynolds said, noting that the metro area has a zoo, art museum, theaters and orchestra. symphonic.

“It surprised me how full a schedule we can have here,” Reynolds said. “It’s a vibrant community. The people who live here are like fish in water. They underestimate what they have.

Reynolds pointed to all of the opportunities Waupaca provides in terms of community involvement, music and the arts, opportunities to not just be spectators, but participants.

“That’s the spirit of this community, to collaborate, to do something,” Reynolds said.

See Good News Waupaca interviews online at https://www.facebook.com/GoodNewsWaupaca/

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New radio show for KCLR in Kilkenny https://lkrlt.org/new-radio-show-for-kclr-in-kilkenny/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 16:04:56 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/new-radio-show-for-kclr-in-kilkenny/ Kilkenny Arts Office and KCLR radio station have collaborated to co-produce a new 12-week show, The Arts Show on the station. The show will share and highlight the region’s artistic and cultural activity. It will showcase and showcase professional practitioners and experiences across art forms and community projects, giving a voice to artists and creative […]]]>

Kilkenny Arts Office and KCLR radio station have collaborated to co-produce a new 12-week show, The Arts Show on the station. The show will share and highlight the region’s artistic and cultural activity. It will showcase and showcase professional practitioners and experiences across art forms and community projects, giving a voice to artists and creative activity across the county.

It is hoped that this will broaden and diversify regional knowledge and potential audiences and provide an opportunity to highlight the intrinsic value and importance of the arts to life in Kilkenny, as well as its economic and social benefits.

Episode 1 of the new show debuted last Wednesday and featured topics such as: the future of cinema, the minds of local visual artists and the life of a musician.

The Future of Cinema segment recorded at the Borris House Festival of Writing and Ideas last summer, featured actor Jeremy Irons and film producer David Puttnam discussing the future of film and cinema.

Next, Elizabeth Cope, a visual artist from Paulstown, spoke about the importance of a live audience to an artist’s work.

The following segment featured the artist, Ramon Kassam, a visual artist in Thomastown, discussing his art and being an artist living and working in Kilkenny.

Finally, Podge McNamee from Ham Sandwich, an Irish indie rock band, spoke about his new album Magnify and his life as a musician. They also mentioned a few Irish bands to watch.

The artistic performance presented by Hugo Jellett is brought to the public by Kilkenny County Council’s Arts Office and Creative Ireland.

If you missed it, you can catch the first episode at: https://kclr96fm.com/episode-1-the-future-of-cinema-local-visual-artists-minds-and-a-musicians-life /?fbclid=IwAR0QNAvXlKfPeGBACXftbt4V2beXmSdW8F3nBR2TQ_CVptQrNh0M

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Why a Black Radio Show Has the “White Lives Matter” Branding https://lkrlt.org/why-a-black-radio-show-has-the-white-lives-matter-branding/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 19:56:36 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/why-a-black-radio-show-has-the-white-lives-matter-branding/ The owners of the “White Lives Matter” trademark don’t own it for the reasons you might think. Since the controversy over Ye’s “White Lives Matter” t-shirts, Inside Edition Digital spoke with one of the two black radio show hosts who currently owns the brand. Civic Cipher, a radio show hosted by Ramses Ja, Q. Ward, […]]]>

The owners of the “White Lives Matter” trademark don’t own it for the reasons you might think.

Since the controversy over Ye’s “White Lives Matter” t-shirts, Inside Edition Digital spoke with one of the two black radio show hosts who currently owns the brand.

Civic Cipher, a radio show hosted by Ramses Ja, Q. Ward, and their executive producer, Maggie B. Knowin, currently owns the trademark of the infamous “White Lives Matter” slogan.

The aim of the show is to empower black and brown voices and to organize discussions on topics that may be difficult, related to society and culture, but are important to have. The show was created in 2020 in response to the desperate call for action and the need for change after the murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery.

In 2016, the Southern Poverty Law Center declared “White Lives Matter” a hate group formed in racist response to “Black Lives Matter” with the goal of promoting the white race.

Inside Edition Digital spoke with host Ramses Ja about the radio station‘s decision to trademark the controversial tagline.

“We are not trademarked, but we will do our best to represent the interests of black and brown people for the rest of our lives,” Ramses told Inside Edition Digital.

The radio show’s hosts aren’t the first to own the controversial slogan born in response to “Black Lives Matter.”

They were approached by a listener, who wished to remain anonymous, to use the slogan they owned before the radio show.

“The reason this person asked us was because they didn’t feel like the right person to be responsible for decisions about the future of this brand,” Ramses says.

Knowing it wouldn’t be an easy decision, the hosts discussed whether or not to take responsibility for being the owners of the brand.

“We realized that maybe it was our business. We are committed to being responsible to speak out and be activists in spaces where it is sometimes uncomfortable,” Ramses says of the decision to take on the brand.

On Ye and his recent behaviors and actions, including the use of the slogan on the shirts he wears in public, Ramses shared his thoughts.

“I remember Kanye West was a person who stood up for black people,” he says, then recalls Ye’s statement, “George Bush doesn’t care about black people.”

“Then I saw Kanye West put the Confederate flag on his shirts at a Yeezy store, then I saw Kanye West a few years later wearing a MAGA hat, then I saw Kanye West wear a trademark phrase on his shirt,” he said.

“I think I know what problematic behavior looks like. And so we’re not in the realm of hate on this show. So I will do my best not to say anything detrimental to this man,” he said. “He’s my brother, for better or for worse, and I wish him well, but this maneuver is to protect our black and brown communities.”

With Ye using the brand’s slogan on the T-shirts, he is unable to sell them due to the former owner and now the show owning the brand.

“This maneuver, I do not believe, was intended to harm [Ye], but rather to prevent it from causing harm to other people. And maybe that’s the spirit that I think we’re headed in,” he says.

“The two most prominent entities associated with this brand are a very famous artist and this radio show,” says the radio show host.

“So one of those entities recognizes the hurt it can create, recognizes how triggering it can be, and the other, from what I understand, thinks it’s something that’s part of fashion culture, fashion week, that sort of thing,” he tells Inside Edition Digital.

When it comes to selling the brand, Ramses makes it clear that the decision to own it was not for monetary gain unless there was a way to benefit black and brown communities on a large scale.

“Right now, we’re not interested in selling, divesting, anything like that. We have been asked to be stewards, we have been asked to be decision makers. We are being asked to sit on it and take all the smoke,” he says.

“Okay, if we got $1 million or $10 million and gave half of it to this NAACP, they would be able to fight battles that are maybe a little bit more pressing in black communities and brunettes. Battles like voter suppression initiatives. They’ll fight battles like police reform and environmental racism, ways to fight back against things like that, that really have real life and death of blacks and browns,” says Ramses.

Although owning the brand as black people carries moral weight, Ramses believes the radio show is able to carry that weight and keep the slogan from falling into the wrong hands.

“I will speak for myself, Maggie, and Q, that we feel responsible, feel a tremendous sense of responsibility to live this moment well and to be excellent stewards, guided by a truth based on love and that s attack hate in a meaningful and impactful way,” Ramses explained.

Related stories

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Fresno’s famed ‘Shock Jock’ steps down from hugely popular SoCal radio show – Reuters https://lkrlt.org/fresnos-famed-shock-jock-steps-down-from-hugely-popular-socal-radio-show-reuters/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 19:34:07 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/fresnos-famed-shock-jock-steps-down-from-hugely-popular-socal-radio-show-reuters/ After 32 years, a famous Southern California “shock jock” who got his start on Fresno State’s campus radio station, is stepping down from the show that made him a star. Cookie “Chainsaw” Randolph is leaving a hugely popular morning show in San Diego in December, with co-host Dave Rickards, radio station KGB-FM announced Tuesday. “Chainsaw […]]]>

After 32 years, a famous Southern California “shock jock” who got his start on Fresno State’s campus radio station, is stepping down from the show that made him a star.

Cookie “Chainsaw” Randolph is leaving a hugely popular morning show in San Diego in December, with co-host Dave Rickards, radio station KGB-FM announced Tuesday.

“Chainsaw began his radio career while attending Fresno State when friends convinced him to do a shift at the campus radio station,” the station’s announcement said.

Randolph was recruited to KGB-FM in 1986 and teamed up with Rickards and the team’s third member, Shelly Dunn, a few years later.

The Dave, Shelly and Chainsaw show, originally called The Dawn Patrol and later renamed “The DSC”, was launched at the station in 1990. It came to dominate local radio ratings for most of his airtime.

The show’s bawdy humor and irreverent attitude have occasionally sparked controversy.

The show moved to a competing radio station after a contract dispute in 2010 before returning to its original home KGB-FM in 2018. Dunn retired that year, but the show continued with other co-hosts.

“Throughout its 32 years, the show ‘DSC’ has remained a ratings leader and earned a reputation as San Diego’s most hilarious morning show,” according to KGB’s statement- FM.

Asked about his upcoming retirement, Chainsaw said, “Getting up and playing for the last few decades for our wonderful KGB audience has been, by far, the greatest privilege of my career. It was a blast and I’m forever grateful.

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First Buzz Williams radio show of 2022-23 scheduled for Oct. 31 – Texas A&M Athletics https://lkrlt.org/first-buzz-williams-radio-show-of-2022-23-scheduled-for-oct-31-texas-am-athletics/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 22:09:07 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/first-buzz-williams-radio-show-of-2022-23-scheduled-for-oct-31-texas-am-athletics/ History links STATION COLLEGE, Texas – The first edition of BuzzWilliams The radio show for the 2022-23 season is scheduled for 7 p.m. Monday, October 31 and originates from Rudy’s Country Store & Bar-BQ at 504 Harvey Road. Fans Invited to Join Fourth-Year Texas A&M Men’s Basketball Head Coach BuzzWilliams and […]]]>

STATION COLLEGE, Texas – The first edition of BuzzWilliams The radio show for the 2022-23 season is scheduled for 7 p.m. Monday, October 31 and originates from Rudy’s Country Store & Bar-BQ at 504 Harvey Road.

Fans Invited to Join Fourth-Year Texas A&M Men’s Basketball Head Coach BuzzWilliams and the voice of the Aggies, Andrew Monaco, at Rudy as they preview the Aggies and the season ahead. Questions can be submitted in person and answered by Coach Williams live.

The BuzzWilliams Radio Show airs on the Texas A&M Sports Network, locally at 4:20 p.m., or worldwide through the 12th Man Mobile app. Fans who can’t attend can watch the broadcast live on the men’s basketball Facebook page (@aggiembk), the 12th Man Mobile app, or the 12th Man TV app (available on Apple TV devices, Roku or Fire Stick). can earn points by attending the radio show and registering using their 12th Man Mobile app. Visit 12thmanrewards.com for more information or to register.

BuzzWilliams Radio Show Schedule 2022-23

7 p.m. | Rudy’s Country Store & Bar-BQ
monday | October 31
monday | November 14
monday | 21 November
monday | November 28
monday | December 5
monday | December 12
monday | January 2
monday | January 9
monday | January 16
monday | February 6
monday | February 13
monday | February 20


For more information, visit: 12thman.com/buzzradio

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Quirky spoken word radio show takes top spot https://lkrlt.org/quirky-spoken-word-radio-show-takes-top-spot/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 06:05:00 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/quirky-spoken-word-radio-show-takes-top-spot/ freedom of listening and freedom of expression 20 years on the air earns broadcast award for Portland, Maine program. “Offline” combines audio theater from famous authors with gripping interviews and comedy. Creative audio production by Michael Townsend with animation and narration by former New Yorker Magazine narrator Dan Bernard. —Dan Bernard PORTLAND, ME, USA, Oct. […]]]>

freedom of listening and freedom of expression

20 years on the air earns broadcast award for Portland, Maine program. “Offline” combines audio theater from famous authors with gripping interviews and comedy.

Creative audio production by Michael Townsend with animation and narration by former New Yorker Magazine narrator Dan Bernard.

—Dan Bernard

PORTLAND, ME, USA, Oct. 25, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — “Speech is immersive. There’s nothing like hearing another human voice tell you a compelling story. Storytelling is an ancient tradition of the human race, and an “Offline”, winner of the Maine Association of Broadcasters first place award for feature films.

“The thing is, we didn’t even know our show had been entered into the contest, so when station management suggested we sit down first, it made sense. For years, Michael Townsend and I have makes quirky, quirky, fun, edgy, edgy-radio creations mixed with comedy, edgy topics, high-profile writers, local and international voice talent. We’ve really honed our approach with Covid hitting the station hard and needing pre-recorded programming. Suddenly we were working remotely while finding a very personal side to what we were producing.”

The half-hour program typically features Bernard hosting and often telling vintage sci-fi, detective tales or local authors along with a diverse cast of actors and comedians from the New England area. , Canada and the UK “We used to do this live from the radio station with a bunch of actors, comedians and improvisers; sometimes even with live sound effects and live musicians. sometimes we improvise a whole program based on a loose structure. But our fake pre-recorded commercials gave the actors some breathing space between the acts!”

The current incarnation of the program features Bernard and other performers of vintage and other sci-fi, as he sometimes shares production duties with executive producer Michael Townsend. “I’ve been supporting Dan for over 20 years, what’s a few more?” Townsend jokes. “We will soon be interviewing Bill Schnee, multiple Grammy-winning producers, based on our mutual love of music and the recording process. Join us?”

Offline airs every Wednesday night at 7pm EST, streaming and archived as well: https://www.wmpg.org/show/wed1900/

Dan Bernard/Michael Townsend
Offline
+1 207-450-8394
info@liveimprov.com

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Kyle and Jackie O leaving their radio show proves how powerful it is https://lkrlt.org/kyle-and-jackie-o-leaving-their-radio-show-proves-how-powerful-it-is/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 04:28:13 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/kyle-and-jackie-o-leaving-their-radio-show-proves-how-powerful-it-is/ Jackie O leaving the airwaves on Friday was a strong reminder that she is one of radio’s most important voices. His storm was a flex. On Friday, KIIS FM hosts Kyle Sandilands and Jackie O ditched their radio show for an internal saga. The pair were interviewing 2GB legend Alan Jones when they were dropped […]]]>

Jackie O leaving the airwaves on Friday was a strong reminder that she is one of radio’s most important voices. His storm was a flex.

On Friday, KIIS FM hosts Kyle Sandilands and Jackie O ditched their radio show for an internal saga.

The pair were interviewing 2GB legend Alan Jones when they were dropped out of thin air mid-conversation. After some back and forth with their team, Sandilands and Jackie O quit smoking for the day.

It is not uncommon for Sandilands to throw in the towel over a dispute. Earlier this year he stormed off the show after defending former NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian.

Usually when he leaves, Jackie O has to pick up the pieces and carry on the show. Kind of like when dad storms out on Christmas Day and mom still has to put lunch on the table.

This time though, Jackie O headed for the exits alongside Sandilands, and her absence left a gaping hole. It can be easy to forget how powerful and important Jackie O is because she plays a different role than her co-host, she’s a quiet achiever while Sandilands is the class clown.

She doesn’t gossip and doesn’t throw tantrums. Even during her divorce, she remained incredibly private despite hitting the airwaves every day. It also doesn’t generate headlines like Sandilands does.

Sure, she still attracts endorsements and has a slew of celebrities, including Sophie Monk, but she rarely graces gossip magazines. Still, don’t confuse those facts with a drop in her worth, and Jackie O reminded everyone how important her worth was, because when she left the show on Friday, it was worth nothing without her.

Jackie O calmly spends her days reasoning and joking with Sandilands. She is witty, intelligent and calm. Sometimes his sheer talent can be overshadowed by Sandilands’ antics. It can be easy to forget that it’s not just the Sandilands show.

Of course, she may have a slightly different role. To use a Friends metaphor, Sandilands is the Joey, and she is the Monica of the duo. But while Joey might get all the silly lines and attention, some of the show’s most memorable moments are because of Monica. Similarly, one could say that Sandilands is the Hamish and Jackie O is the Andy.

Fabulously Sandilands always knew the value of Jackie O. In April 2021, he spoke to Mia Freedman’s No Filter podcast about how he felt “paralyzed” when in 1999 he realized he was paid significantly more than his co-host Jackie ‘O’ Henderson. At the time, he was making $258,000 a year, and Henderson told him she was making $80,000.

“I was like, ‘What do you mean by $80,000? You’re Jackie O’. I just assumed we were getting the same thing. I didn’t know there was diversity or difference. I didn’t know anything about it,” he told Freedman.

Sandilands claimed he then went to management and demanded that their pay be equal. He even offered to lower his salary so that Jackie O could be paid the same. In the end, the station agreed to give him equal pay.

Still, it should come as no surprise that Sandilands understands the value of Jackie O. Every day she gives him space and is the bouncy board that lets him do his thing.

Without Jackie O providing calm to the stormy Sandilands, the show would seem too brash and mean-spirited. She brings warmth and heart to the airwaves and brings out the best in Sandilands.

Jackie O can defuse awkward moments and often acts as a translator when he steps into it. For example, during a recent apology on Sandilands using ableist language, Jackie O was next to him to clarify what he meant.

When Jackie O strutted around on Friday, it reminded us that she’s the most powerful woman on radio, but not just the most powerful woman. He’s the most powerful personality on our airwaves, period.

Mary Madigan is a freelance writer.

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