Radio station – LKRLT http://lkrlt.org/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 13:51:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lkrlt.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-11-150x150.png Radio station – LKRLT http://lkrlt.org/ 32 32 KEXP appoints new leader at a turning point for flagship Seattle radio station https://lkrlt.org/kexp-appoints-new-leader-at-a-turning-point-for-flagship-seattle-radio-station/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 20:11:45 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/kexp-appoints-new-leader-at-a-turning-point-for-flagship-seattle-radio-station/ Over its 50-year history, KEXP has grown from a scrappy college radio station to a renowned multimedia organization with a global audience. As the Seattle institution crosses the half-century mark, a number of changes have occurred in recent years. Following the recent departure of longtime CEO and Executive Director Tom Mara, a new executive from […]]]>

Over its 50-year history, KEXP has grown from a scrappy college radio station to a renowned multimedia organization with a global audience. As the Seattle institution crosses the half-century mark, a number of changes have occurred in recent years.

Following the recent departure of longtime CEO and Executive Director Tom Mara, a new executive from the independent radio stronghold has been selected to oversee the next chapter in KEXP’s evolution. Ethan Raup, who has served as KEXP’s chief operating officer for the past six years, has been named the new president and chief executive officer.

“I think we’re on an incredible path right now,” said Raup, who officially begins his new gig on July 1. “I feel good about the role I’ve played in helping get us on this path, and I’m so excited about the next steps that I know we can take.

Raup’s hiring follows a six-month international search to replace Mara, who was recently named executive director of the Seattle International Film Festival. A press release announcing Raup’s selection touted his work addressing pay equity at the station, technology investments focused on digital audiences, and his efforts in programming changes that helped elevate a more diverse array of voices. within the organization.

Despite losing its 30-year-old leader, the search committee was not initially concerned with maintaining a sense of continuity at the top of the organization, said Jill Singh, chair of KEXP’s board of directors. Throughout the interview process, Raup continually brought in new ideas and demonstrated “a style of leadership that we knew we were looking for,” she said. His knowledge of the inner workings of the station and “how far the organization has come” ultimately became an added asset in the eyes of the board of directors, who unanimously chose Raup.

“Ultimately, Ethan is an active leader within KEXP and he gets things done,” Singh said. “He’s very action-oriented and that told us, seeing the evidence of that over the last two years, that we really knew what he could do.”

Prior to joining KEXP more than eight years ago, Raup gained extensive experience in local government, working under former Seattle Mayors Mike McGinn and Norm Rice as well as former King County Executive Ron Sims.

Over the next few months, Raup plans to begin a strategic planning process with “widespread engagement” among staff and community members to identify ways to reach new listeners and better serve the KEXP’s existing audience through its radio/online broadcast and popular YouTube channel, among others. avenues. KEXP has also ventured into podcasting, first with its thoughtful “Sound & Vision” series and the recent “Fresh Off the Spaceship,” an in-depth limited series exploring the Seattle-based Black Constellation collective.

Two years ago, KEXP reconfigured its prime-time weekday schedule that had previously been filled with mostly white male DJs, creating slots for Larry Mizell Jr. and Gabriel Teodros, two respected veterans of Seattle’s music community. . The station also added its “Overnight Afrobeats” show and promoted Albina Cabrera to a full-time role as a Latin American content producer and co-host of “El Sonido”, KEXP’s Latin music show. These measures were part of the station’s commitment to becoming an anti-racism organization and were accompanied by measures to address pay equity gaps within the station.

“We’re at a point now, I think – between [recent] investments and the deliberate path we charted two years ago to really open up and welcome more voices – we’re in an incredible position to really think big about the future,” Raup said.

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New radio station Pride Vibes hits the airwaves in Ireland to celebrate LGBTQ+ stories https://lkrlt.org/new-radio-station-pride-vibes-hits-the-airwaves-in-ireland-to-celebrate-lgbtq-stories/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:57:36 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/new-radio-station-pride-vibes-hits-the-airwaves-in-ireland-to-celebrate-lgbtq-stories/ A NEW radio station has hit the airwaves in Ireland that aims to celebrate LGBTQ+ stories. Pride Vibes landed just in time for Dublin Pride, with the parade taking to the streets of the capital tomorrow. 1 Launch of the station…Han Tiernan of GCN, Conor Behan of Pride Vibes, Freya Carroll of Belong To and […]]]>

A NEW radio station has hit the airwaves in Ireland that aims to celebrate LGBTQ+ stories.

Pride Vibes landed just in time for Dublin Pride, with the parade taking to the streets of the capital tomorrow.

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Launch of the station…Han Tiernan of GCN, Conor Behan of Pride Vibes, Freya Carroll of Belong To and Pride Vibes presenter Thomas Crosse1 credit

A team of entertainers will broadcast music, conversations and documentaries all summer long.

Ireland’s first radio station for the LGBTQ+ community is being developed by radio group Wireless Ireland, who say Pride is both a protest and a celebration.

The station said it focuses on the broader community nationally and locally, and hopes to make a difference by celebrating and shining a light on the LGBTQ+ movement.

They also aim to start conversations about issues important to the LGBTQ+ community.

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Explaining why he got involved, presenter Thomas Crosse said: “Now more than ever it’s important for us to have a voice, to shout who we are and to march for those who can’t!

“Pride Vibes has been fantastic for all of us in the LGBTQIA+ community and our allies with open and honest conversations and the spreading of the best music as we prepare to march through the streets of Dublin this Saturday.”

Presenter Kate Brennan Harding added: “Pride is an important time to come together and find our colorful tribe, to unite in solidarity and to show people like us that we live bright, vivid and powerful lives.

“It’s something that has given me so much comfort and empowerment in my 23 years at Pride.”

Most read in The Irish Sun

Pride Vibes is a collaborative project between leading LGBTQ+ organizations to give the community a space to share their stories and make their voices heard.

And the radio station’s official charity partner is Belong To, an organization that supports gay, lesbian, bisexual and trans youth in Ireland.

Belong To CEO Moninne Griffith said, “We are thrilled to partner with Pride Vibes to help celebrate Pride and support our work with LGBTQ+ youth.

“By sharing information about our support services and youth groups, Pride Vibes will allow us to reach LGBTQ+ youth across the country.”

HISTORY OF PRIDE

She added, “We thank them for championing our work to help young LGBTQ+ people stay alive and thrive.”

Through Gay Community News, the station is also able to share moments of LGBTQ+ history through audio and social media.

Pride Vibes are also working with Dublin Pride to ensure Pride’s prominence continues throughout the summer.

Another major contributor is Core, which is Ireland’s largest marketing communications company.

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They gave their support and consulted the promotion of the station and created a sponsorship platform for it.

Voltarol is the main sponsor of Pride Vibes.

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Launch of a new radio station, Pride Vibes, in Ireland. https://lkrlt.org/launch-of-a-new-radio-station-pride-vibes-in-ireland/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 20:48:06 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/launch-of-a-new-radio-station-pride-vibes-in-ireland/ As Dublin Pride hits the streets this weekend, Pride Vibes, Ireland’s first radio station for the LGBTQIA+ community, will hit the airwaves. The station, available at PrideVibes.comincludes a program of music, conversations and documentaries to inform, educate and entertain listeners. The station is developed by the Wireless Ireland radio group. Pride is both a protest […]]]>

As Dublin Pride hits the streets this weekend, Pride Vibes, Ireland’s first radio station for the LGBTQIA+ community, will hit the airwaves. The station, available at PrideVibes.comincludes a program of music, conversations and documentaries to inform, educate and entertain listeners.

The station is developed by the Wireless Ireland radio group. Pride is both a protest and a celebration, and Pride Vibes broadcasts in solidarity with the movement. Pride Vibes will be there to shine a light on Irish life by celebrating the successes of the LGBTQIA+ community and starting conversations about the issues that matter. The station focuses on the whole community, both nationally and locally, and in collaboration with the community, Pride Vibes hopes to make a difference.

The project is a collaboration between leading LGBTQIA+ organizations to provide space for the community to share stories. Belong To is the official charity partner of Pride Vibes. The organization supports lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans youth in Ireland. The station shares important moments in queer history through audio and social media thanks to GCN (Gay Community News). Pride Vibes also works with Dublin Pride to ensure the energy and significance of Pride continues throughout the summer weeks.

Han Tiernan GCN, Conor Behan Pride Vibes, Freya Carroll Belong To, Thomas Crosse Pride Vibes.

Another key contributor to Pride Vibes is Core, Ireland’s largest marketing communications company, which provided support and advice on promoting the station and created a sponsorship platform for the station. Voltarol, which “celebrates the joy of movement”, is the main sponsor of the station.

Speaking about why they got involved, presenter Thomas Crosse said: “Now more than ever it is important for us to have a voice, to shout who we are and to march for those who cannot! Pride Vibes has been fantastic for all of us in the LGBTQIA+ community and our allies with open and honest conversations as well as playing the best music as we prepare to march through the streets of Dublin this Saturday.

Presenter Kate Brennan Harding said: “Pride is an important time to come together and reunite with our colorful tribe, to unite in solidarity and to show people like us that we live bright, vivid and powerful lives. It’s something that has given me so much comfort and empowerment in my 23 years of involvement with Pride.

Moninne Griffith (her), CEO, Charity Partner, Belong To commented: “We are thrilled to partner with Pride Vibes to help celebrate Pride and support our work with LGBTQ+ youth. By sharing information about our support services and youth groups, Pride Vibes will allow us to reach LGBTQ+ youth across the country. We thank them for championing our work to help LGBTQ+ youth stay alive and thrive.

www.pridevibes.ie

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Country Radio Station KRTY Ditches FM and Heads to ‘The Future’ https://lkrlt.org/country-radio-station-krty-ditches-fm-and-heads-to-the-future/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:00:32 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/country-radio-station-krty-ditches-fm-and-heads-to-the-future/ Local radio stations become part of the fabric of a community and listeners become like extended family members to the broadcasters. So there was a lot of emotion Friday at KRTY’s San Jose studio, which shut down shortly after 9 a.m. — its 95.3 FM frequency taken over by the Educational Media Foundation. The last […]]]>

Local radio stations become part of the fabric of a community and listeners become like extended family members to the broadcasters. So there was a lot of emotion Friday at KRTY’s San Jose studio, which shut down shortly after 9 a.m. — its 95.3 FM frequency taken over by the Educational Media Foundation.

The last song to stream live was Brad Paisley’s “Welcome to the Future,” which was fitting since it wasn’t the end for KRTY. This is Silicon Valley, after all. After the FM signal was restored, the broadcast continued on krty.comas morning hosts Gary Scott Thomas and Julie Stevens presented a pre-recorded interview they did with country star Kenny Chesney.

“It’s not a funeral, it’s a graduation,” said Thomas, who was surprised by a gathering of family and friends outside the station after finishing the show. “We get our certificates and take it to the next level.”

The transition to online streaming was a hot topic — with plenty of memories — during a live panel discussion that morning with Stevens, Thomas, general manager Nate Deaton and hosts “Indiana Al” Breiten and Michael Moore . The station has a solid reputation in the country music community — it’s the No. 1 country station in the top 75 markets, Deaton said — and its listener base has grown beyond the Bay Area. on line.

It’s true that some people might not have internet access to continue listening, Thomas acknowledged, “but I don’t have access to a size 28 either.”

Station staff are dwindling, but the full roster of hosts and others remaining on board will continue as unpaid volunteers for the next three months to see if listeners follow them. “So many people have come to us and said they’re so excited that this is the next step,” Deaton said, “and I think that’s the future of radio.”

KRTY has had a big impact off the air as well, and that will continue with events like its series at Clos La Chance, from concerts at Club Rodeo and KRTY Nights to San Jose Giants games. Thomas says he and his fellow hosts enjoy seeing listeners face-to-face at these events and are glad these are continuing even with KRTY off the air. “We have listeners who remember our first day on the air,” Thomas said, “and the good thing about streaming is now, if they leave the area, they can still listen to us.”

PRESIDENTIAL HEARING: In 1992, Larry Stone co-organized Silicon Valley’s first meeting with Bill Clinton, then governor of Arkansas and not yet a declared presidential candidate. Famously, Stone missed seeing Texas pitcher Nolan Ryan not hit the A’s that night, but started a friendship with the future president and later gathered a small group of Silicon Valley business leaders to meet him. in Cupertino. Clinton ended up with the endorsement of 32 Valley CEOs and business leaders.

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WRHI Named Finalist for South Carolina Radio Station of the Year for 15th Time in Past 17 Years https://lkrlt.org/wrhi-named-finalist-for-south-carolina-radio-station-of-the-year-for-15th-time-in-past-17-years/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 18:35:00 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/wrhi-named-finalist-for-south-carolina-radio-station-of-the-year-for-15th-time-in-past-17-years/ WRHI was selected as one of two finalists for South Carolina Radio Station of the Year for the 15th time in the past 17 years by the South Carolina Broadcasters Association. WRHI has won the award 8 of the previous 14 times (finishing second the other 6), which ties WTCB-FM with Columbia for the most […]]]>

WRHI was selected as one of two finalists for South Carolina Radio Station of the Year for the 15th time in the past 17 years by the South Carolina Broadcasters Association. WRHI has won the award 8 of the previous 14 times (finishing second the other 6), which ties WTCB-FM with Columbia for the most in state history. In total, WRHI and sister station WRHM are finalists for 15 awards. Among the finalists is WRHI’s annual Toys For Happiness Project, which is a finalist for Service Project of the Year. Chris Miller is a Sportscaster of the Year finalist for the 12th consecutive year (he won the award in 2021). WRHI’s Palmetto Mornings is a finalist for Radio Show of the Year (Palmetto Mornings won the award in 2021) and a finalist for News-Talk Show of the Year. Straight Talk is a Public Affairs Show of the Year finalist (Straight Talk won the award in 2021). Steven Stone is a finalist for Journalist of the Year. The other radio station finalist for Radio Station of the Year is Colombia’s WFMV-FM. Finalists for Television Station of the Year are WIS in Colombia and WLTX in Colombia. Two finalists are named in each category. The annual STAR Awards, honoring South Carolina’s top radio and television stations, takes place August 13 at Columbia.

OTS Media FINALISTS:

Radio of the year: WRHI-AM/FM
Uray Service Project of the Year: toys for happiness
Radio Show of the Year: Palmetto Mornings
Sports Animator of the Year: Chris Miller
Journalist of the Year: Peter Steven
Public Affairs Program of the Year: Speak frankly
Sporting event of the year: The red zone
Current Affairs Talkshow of the Year: Palmetto Mornings
Better convergence coverage: 4th Annual WRHI Football City USA Kickoff
Better convergence coverage: South Pointe Football State Championship
News coverage of the year: Lesslie family murders
News coverage of the year: The Price brothers arrested
Best pandemic-related service to the community: Congressman Norman Town Hall
PSA of the Year: Maxabilities
PSA of the Year: Don’t Litter Lancaster County

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Sports radio 790 The Score https://lkrlt.org/sports-radio-790-the-score/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 16:15:25 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/sports-radio-790-the-score/ PROVIDENCE — 24-hour sports programming returns to the airwaves in Rhode Island. In an announcement posted to YouTube on Wednesday, Cumulus Media said “790 The Score” would return and feature 24/7 sports programming, including national sports personality Jim Rome, the local radio host on sports, Kevin McNamara, as well as game coverage. New York Yankees […]]]>

PROVIDENCE — 24-hour sports programming returns to the airwaves in Rhode Island.

In an announcement posted to YouTube on Wednesday, Cumulus Media said “790 The Score” would return and feature 24/7 sports programming, including national sports personality Jim Rome, the local radio host on sports, Kevin McNamara, as well as game coverage. New York Yankees baseball, Boston Celtics Basketball as good as Brown University Football and basketball games.

Scott Zolak and Andy Gresh were popular sports talk show hosts on the original

A source with knowledge of the talks told the Journal that all-sports programming would begin no later than August, a transition from the station’s current right-wing radio programming.

The Score format aired in Rhode Island for 10 years before being discontinued in 2008 and featured hosts Andy Gresh, Scott Cordischi, Scott Zolak, John Crowe and more. It was founded in the fall of 1997 and has chronicled a period of unprecedented success for the Red Sox – who overturned their 86-year curse in the World Series – and now the Patriots, six-time Super champions Bowl.

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Suria FM radio on the uptrend, with an 11% increase in listeners https://lkrlt.org/suria-fm-radio-on-the-uptrend-with-an-11-increase-in-listeners/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/suria-fm-radio-on-the-uptrend-with-an-11-increase-in-listeners/ Malay-language radio station Suria FM has plenty to celebrate as it managed to attract over 3.4 million listeners per week. This is an increase of 11% or 350,000 listeners, according to the GfK Radio Hearing Measurement survey, Wave 1 2022. Overall, within the station, the weekday morning show, Pagi Suria Team (6 a.m. to 10 […]]]>

Malay-language radio station Suria FM has plenty to celebrate as it managed to attract over 3.4 million listeners per week. This is an increase of 11% or 350,000 listeners, according to the GfK Radio Hearing Measurement survey, Wave 1 2022.

Overall, within the station, the weekday morning show, Pagi Suria Team (6 a.m. to 10 a.m.) recorded the highest increase (18%). And among all the commercial Malay language radio stations in Malaysia, Pagi Suria Team – hosted by Ajak, Fizi Ali and Suraya Borhan – recorded the biggest jump in terms of exclusive listeners, at 22%.

The Suria Cinta The segment (Sunday to Friday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.), hosted by award-winning DJ Lin, has the highest weekly listening time (TSL) among commercial Malay-language radio stations, with an average of two hours and 40 minutes.

Meanwhile, Gaya Suria (weekdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and Suria Petang (Weekdays, 3pm-7pm) on Suria are shows among the top three stations in Malaysia that recorded the highest number of listeners in these timeslots.

“The success achieved is the result of the hard work of everyone at Suria FM. At Suria, we are committed to improving radio performance in all aspects, especially digital,” says DJ Lin who is also the General Manager. by Suria FM.

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After flirting with selling its radio station, Dallas will instead let KERA take over https://lkrlt.org/after-flirting-with-selling-its-radio-station-dallas-will-instead-let-kera-take-over/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 17:41:45 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/after-flirting-with-selling-its-radio-station-dallas-will-instead-let-kera-take-over/ Dallas is the only city in the United States to have its own radio station, which is one of the few commercial classic stations in the country. It’s so old, in fact, that it was only the second station ever licensed by the Federal Communications Commission. The WRR has a fascinating history and the next […]]]>

Dallas is the only city in the United States to have its own radio station, which is one of the few commercial classic stations in the country. It’s so old, in fact, that it was only the second station ever licensed by the Federal Communications Commission. The WRR has a fascinating history and the next chapter is about to be written.

But it looked like that chapter might come to an abrupt end when some Dallas City Council members floated the idea of ​​possibly selling the resort at a Quality of Life, Arts and Culture committee meeting in May. This alarmed WRR fans, who launched a campaign to urge the council to stick to a plan to allow KERA to take over the day-to-day operations of the century-old station.

Ahead of Wednesday’s vote to approve the deal between KERA and the city, Councilman Paul Ridley said he had received “literally hundreds” of emails supporting the deal.

Several council members spoke in favor of the contract before the vote.

“It’s great to have someone to play this (classical music) when you wake up in the morning and when you fall asleep at night,” Councilman Tennell Atkins said. “You think people don’t listen to him, but they really do.”

WRR marketing director Amy Bishop was one of 10 supporters who spoke during public comments in support of the deal.

“This radio station and the music it plays appeals to the hearts and imaginations of all ages, colors and nationalities,” she said. “You can put a price on a radio station, but you can’t put a price on the community enrichment that comes with keeping WRR alive if you just give it and KERA a chance to show you off.”

All this worry was either for nothing or to change the situation. Even the guy who pitched the sale at the May briefing, South Dallas and Fair Park Councilman Adam Bazaldua, voted in favor of the deal at Wednesday’s council meeting.

“We would absolutely miss the mark by making the decision to think there is a dollar amount that could be more valuable than continuing to allow the station to (contribute) to the arts community,” he said. .

When it was announced in May that KERA was the preferred bidder to take over operations from WRR, it seemed like a slam-dunk for everyone involved. The town would retain a historic asset but also withdraw from running a radio station, which many believe was not designed to work well.

But Bazaldua (at the time) had other thoughts, wondering about the wisdom of the town clinging to that terrestrial radio, wondering if it was time to sell before its value plummeted. He felt that historically the station’s purpose was, in part, to help raise more money to support the city’s arts community through advertising sales.

“Times have changed and we are no longer contributing to this artistic endowment,” he said. “I take it as a question, ‘Is the job of the City of Dallas to own radio stations if we don’t reinvest money in direct resources for our residents?’ If not, I think the answer is no.

According to a memo from the city’s Office of Arts and Culture, the station has a potential value of about $13.4 million. It would take 18 months to two years to close a sale, and about $7.5 million in cash would have been available to the city, part of which would go to a brokerage commission and about $5.6 million to repayment of the net deficit of WRR.

The station’s corporate fund expense allocation is $1.8 million and last year’s revenue was $1.3 million. The station is expected to gross around $1.5 million this year.

In May, Bazaldua floated the idea of ​​putting the station up for sale. He suggested that KERA might even want to pay for it.

But this rosy scenario was not guaranteed. For one thing, if the city were to put the station up for sale, it can’t impose any sort of stipulation on what kind of format the potential buyer can choose after the sale.

“If the city were to put it up for sale, anyone could bid on it — it wouldn’t just be public, nonprofit media,” Nico Leone, KERA’s president and CEO, told me during an interview. a phone call shortly after the May committee meeting. . “Literally any company, any individual, there’s no restriction on who could actually buy it.

“If you put a broadcast license up for sale, the FCC doesn’t allow you to restrict how it’s used by whoever bought it,” he said. “So there’s no legal way, if the city chooses to put it up for sale, for them to say, ‘It’s got to be a classic station.'”

KERA could successfully run the station, he said, because it can address some of the main reasons why WRR is currently floundering.

To understand this, you need to understand a little about how ad sales work. Often, to get those big advertisers, it takes a little wine and dinner. Advertising sales is also generally a commission-based business. City employees are not allowed to do these things. What about WRR sales staff? They are city employees.

By changing the station’s FCC license from commercial to non-commercial, KERA can add WRR into the fold of other member-supported offerings that include two radio stations, a television station and its online presence.

“There are a lot of benefits for the community, for the city, for the public and for arts organizations to have a good classical station,” Leone said. “A problem from the Arts and Culture Bureau’s perspective, from a budget perspective, is that it’s losing some of the money there, because it’s structured like a commercial station. They cannot fundraise, and they are otherwise restricted by the city that operates them. We can remove these constraints and make them sustainable.

But with Spotify, Pandora, Sirius XM and other streaming services, is there really a need for a city-owned terrestrial station?

“We really hope the answer is yes, because that’s our business,” Leone said with a chuckle. “Our business is to provide meaningful, high-quality content, whether it’s news; whether it is educational programs; or whether it’s music, art or culture, for everyone.

Having a terrestrial station is also a matter of fairness, he said, explaining that many streaming services aren’t free and, as we’ve learned during the pandemic, not everyone in the city doesn’t have the Internet bandwidth to reliably support them.

Leone also challenged the idea that there was no market for classical radio, explaining that while classical radio might not thrive on the business side of the dial, Leone said it was still in the market. public radio play.

“There’s a group of about 40 public radio stations that have worked together over the last five to ten years on an initiative called Rise of classical musicwho really worked on best practices and what it means to be a non-commercial classic radio station.

This group, he said, looked at everything from how to bring diversity to musical offerings to fundraising best practices designed to generate dollars behind classical music.

A fact sheet from Classical Music Rising provided statistics on the viability of classical music stations. According to Nielsen Audio figures from 2016, nearly 11 million Americans listen to classical music on public radio each week, of which 6.5 million listen to all-classical stations and 4.2 million listen to stations that offer a combination classical music and news.

Nielsen’s fall 2016 figures showed the all-classic format also had a stable viewership, the organization said. Infinite Dial’s Q2 2017 “Share of Ear” report found AM/FM radio reaches 71% of Americans daily and radio still plays more than half the time people spend listening to music , compared to online streaming services and their own libraries.

KERA will formally take control of WRR in December, giving public radio and the city six months to apply to convert the station’s license from a commercial license to a non-commercial license, and to transfer operations to KERA to so she can start fundraising.

The contract will be good for seven years, with two chances for an eight-year renewal, based on FCC license renewal requirements. The city is expected to review the success of the project at these times as well.

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Bethany Erickson

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Bethany Erickson is the Senior Digital Editor of Magazine D. She has written about real estate, education policy, the stock market, and crime throughout her career, and sometimes all at the same time. She hates lima beans and 5 a.m. and takes SAT practice tests for fun.

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Russian radio station hacked to play Ukrainian national anthem https://lkrlt.org/russian-radio-station-hacked-to-play-ukrainian-national-anthem/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/russian-radio-station-hacked-to-play-ukrainian-national-anthem/ On Wednesday, hackers targeted Russian radio station Kommersant FM, playing the Ukrainian national anthem and anti-war songs in protest against Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine. The station was quickly taken off the air. “The radio has been hacked. Internet flow will soon be restored,” the station said. confirmed in a report. The hackers’ anti-war offering included […]]]>

On Wednesday, hackers targeted Russian radio station Kommersant FM, playing the Ukrainian national anthem and anti-war songs in protest against Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine.

The station was quickly taken off the air. “The radio has been hacked. Internet flow will soon be restored,” the station said. confirmed in a report.

The hackers’ anti-war offering included the song by Russian rock band Nogu Svelo! “We don’t need a war” which repeatedly features a quote from Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov that roughly translates to “a tough guy always keeps his word.”

The Kommersant FM hack is the latest in a series of digital attacks since Russia invaded Ukraine.

Earlier in May, Russian YouTube alternative Rutube was taken offline by a cyberattack ahead of the annual Victory Day parade in Red Square.

Also in May, Ukrainian media also published photos purporting to show a hack of several Russian TV channels. The channels appeared to be broadcasting a message that read: “The blood of thousands of Ukrainians and hundreds of their children is on your hands. Television and the authorities are lying. No to war”.

In April, hackers also leaked the personal data of 120,000 Russian servicemen apparently fighting in Ukraine as well as data from the Ministry of Culture, central bank and communications regulator Roskomnadzor.

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Radio station raises over $3,000 for Shriner Hospital for Children https://lkrlt.org/radio-station-raises-over-3000-for-shriner-hospital-for-children/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 23:47:08 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/radio-station-raises-over-3000-for-shriner-hospital-for-children/ June 5, 2022 4:44 p.m. Job : June 5, 2022 4:44 p.m. Updated: June 5, 2022 4:57 p.m. Jeff Jacobs presents a check to the Columbia Basin Shrine Club. KENNEWICK, Wash. – A local radio station raised more than three thousand dollars for the Shriner Hospital for Children after hosting a car show on Saturday. […]]]>
Jeff Jacobs presents a check to the Columbia Basin Shrine Club.

KENNEWICK, Wash. – A local radio station raised more than three thousand dollars for the Shriner Hospital for Children after hosting a car show on Saturday.

Jacobs Radio hosted the event in Kennewick and brought in hundreds of people, despite the weather. Cars of all kinds were displayed outside the radio station’s location on West Falls Avenue, just off Highway 395.

The auto show was organized for the benefit Shriner Hospital for Children in Spokane. The hospital primarily focuses on children’s orthopedic conditions, including clubfoot, scoliosis, and other conditions. They also help children with cleft lips and burns and provide all health care free to families.

“I’m a Shriner kid myself,” said Jeff Jacobs, owner of Jacobs Radio Stations. “It’s really important to me to be able to give back.”

The auto show brought in a total of $3,431 at the event.

“It gives me hope,” said Richard Redick, president of the Columbia Basin Shrine Club. “Especially as inflation continues and the economy slows, people continue to donate and provide to charities. And it’s great to see.

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