Radio station – LKRLT http://lkrlt.org/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:34:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://lkrlt.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-11-150x150.png Radio station – LKRLT http://lkrlt.org/ 32 32 Absolute Radio to launch radio station named after listener – RadioToday https://lkrlt.org/absolute-radio-to-launch-radio-station-named-after-listener-radiotoday/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:34:00 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/absolute-radio-to-launch-radio-station-named-after-listener-radiotoday/ A new radio station is about to launch the name of an Absolute Radio contest winner. In the promotion titled Absolute Radio You, listeners are asked to describe their own perfect radio station, including the five songs they would play to launch it. Dave Berry announced the new service on his breakfast show this morning […]]]>
4audio

A new radio station is about to launch the name of an Absolute Radio contest winner.

In the promotion titled Absolute Radio You, listeners are asked to describe their own perfect radio station, including the five songs they would play to launch it.

Dave Berry announced the new service on his breakfast show this morning after teasing it for the past two weeks.

The contest will run until the end of January and the personal station will go live temporarily in February.

Absolute Radio Breakfast presenter Dave Berry said, “I’m really looking forward to sharing this unique contest with our listeners in January, it’s going to be a lot of fun! Absolute Radio has a station for every musical decade, as well as some classic rock and country music, so we thought it was time for a lucky listener to have their own station – Absolute Radio You.

“What an incredible opportunity for someone to start their own radio station and be able to share it with people across the UK. “

Posted on Tuesday January 4, 2022 at 8:34 am by Duty Reporter

Get real-time updates straight to your device, subscribe now.


Source link

]]>
Cat community radio breakfast show ends on a high https://lkrlt.org/cat-community-radio-breakfast-show-ends-on-a-high/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:06:20 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/cat-community-radio-breakfast-show-ends-on-a-high/ Community radio presenter Gary Johnson finished his last breakfast on local community radio station The Cat 107.9 FM, writes Jonathan Blanc. Gary’s first Breakfast Show went live on June 29, 2019 – and until December 31, 2021, he had presented every day of the week (7 a.m. to 9 a.m.), 600 shows in total. His […]]]>

Community radio presenter Gary Johnson finished his last breakfast on local community radio station The Cat 107.9 FM, writes Jonathan Blanc.

Gary’s first Breakfast Show went live on June 29, 2019 – and until December 31, 2021, he had presented every day of the week (7 a.m. to 9 a.m.), 600 shows in total.

His show updated listeners with local and national news, sports, entertainment, traffic information and travel between readings of a wide selection of music.

He also co-hosted his show every Thursday – “Thursday is the New Friday” – with talented local singer-songwriter Megan Lee.

Each show was broadcast from the state-of-the-art studios of The Cat Radio at Cheshire College – South & West in Crewe.

Gary has interrupted his show due to professional commitments. He is the managing director of Crewe Market Hall, which reopened earlier in 2021 after a £ 3million renovation.

He will always be involved with The Cat, as he is a non-executive director and will continue to host The Saturday Sports Show.

New Breakfast Show host Paul Jones takes over from Gary this month.

“It was an absolute privilege to host the Cat Breakfast show because for most radio stations, whether local or national, it is often considered one of the flagship shows,” Gary said.

“I will not miss the 5am departures, nor for that matter my wife Christine.

“However, I will miss the interaction and support of listeners who have logged in over my time in the hot seat.

“It allows me to warmly thank all of the listeners, program sponsor RK Henshall and traffic and travel sponsor Window Wizard.

“And finally, I would like to send my best wishes to new presenter Paul Jones, you will have a good time Paul, all the best.”

Chris Cadman, Managing Director of The Cat, said, “Gary came to The Cat without any radio experience and quickly became the much loved early morning voice.

“I’m sure The Cat listeners will miss Gary’s voice waking them up in the morning.

“Gary trades early in the morning for Saturday afternoon, bringing his own twist to our Saturday sports show.

“On behalf of all of us here at The Cat, thank you Gary for your commitment to these wee mornings – enjoy the lie in. “

The Cat is run by 40 volunteers and broadcasts 24 hours a day on 107.9 FM and online at http://thisisthecat.com/


Source link

]]>
Farmville radio station WFLO signs after 75 years https://lkrlt.org/farmville-radio-station-wflo-signs-after-75-years/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 17:20:05 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/farmville-radio-station-wflo-signs-after-75-years/ FARMVILLE, Virginia – After 75 years on the air, Farmville’s Legacy Radio – WFLO – marks New Years Eve for the last time. The station is now part of the daily routine of hundreds of listeners. “It’s a tough day for us today, a lot of emotions are happening,” said host Francis Wood. Francis has […]]]>

FARMVILLE, Virginia – After 75 years on the air, Farmville’s Legacy Radio – WFLO – marks New Years Eve for the last time.

The station is now part of the daily routine of hundreds of listeners.

“It’s a tough day for us today, a lot of emotions are happening,” said host Francis Wood.

Francis has been the voice of the “Call FLO” radio show for 50 years.

“Have a cup of coffee and spend some time with us,” Francis told listeners on his last show.

But Francis is not only a radio host, he is also the president and CEO of the station. He said things started to deteriorate financially after the 2008 recession, and the pandemic gave him no choice but to sell.

“A lot of the businesses that have come to the region are now franchises,” he explained. “They’re run by Corporate America, and they don’t buy local media for the most part. “

Although the station is located in Farmville, it has reached hundreds of people in several counties in rural Virginia.

“Happy birthday to Thomas Coleman and Bobby Motley,” Chris Wood reads on air. “They come from the Crewe-Burkeville area.

“You can imagine, these days you have the internet and you know the schools contact the students and everything, but there are a lot of people in the rural areas who are not connected to the internet. And they depend on the radio. “

Several listeners called “FLO Call” on Friday morning to thank Francis and his team for their years of service.

“You are good people, you are still friends,” said one viewer.

While the people who work at WFLO will no longer walk into the booth or build together, Francis said they will stay close.

“We’re not just a family here at FLO,” he noted. “Our family has a great reach, and these listeners are part of our family. That’s why it’s so hard to let go.”

As Francis and his team say goodbye one last time, they leave the airwaves, but leave a lasting impact on this community.

“We are your hometown radio station, and always will be,” Francis said. “In your hearts forever. Take care of all of you.”

WFLO’s final broadcast is Friday at 6 p.m.

The station would like to thank the local businesses and listeners who have kept them in business for so long.


Source link

]]>
Ke Buena, Spokane’s First Spanish Language Commercial Radio Station, Reflects Growing Community | Arts & Culture | Spokane | Interior of the Pacific Northwest https://lkrlt.org/ke-buena-spokanes-first-spanish-language-commercial-radio-station-reflects-growing-community-arts-culture-spokane-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 09:30:40 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/ke-buena-spokanes-first-spanish-language-commercial-radio-station-reflects-growing-community-arts-culture-spokane-interior-of-the-pacific-northwest/ Click to enlarge Photo of young Kwak Rafael Cárdenas interviews Latinos in Spokane co-founder Jennyfer Mesa by phone during La Voz del Pueblo. RAfael Cárdenas’ mother wanted him to be a priest, but the young boy from western Michoacán, Mexico, had other ideas. Although he was committed to serving the community and was a reader […]]]>

Click to enlarge

Photo of young Kwak

Rafael Cárdenas interviews Latinos in Spokane co-founder Jennyfer Mesa by phone during La Voz del Pueblo.

RAfael Cárdenas’ mother wanted him to be a priest, but the young boy from western Michoacán, Mexico, had other ideas. Although he was committed to serving the community and was a reader of the scriptures during Sunday mass, Cárdenas aspired to be an engineer or a similar profession.

In a way, mamá prevailed.

The best part of his job as a radio DJ is connecting and encouraging people, says Cárdenas, who has spent almost 30 years with various entirely Spanish radio stations in Tri-Cities. In July 2020, he helped launch the Spokane-based Spanish-language radio station Ke Buena and is its lead DJ.

Ke Buena is familiar for “it’s okay,” according to Ben Reed, who runs the station from his southern Idaho home and whose distinct baritone can sometimes be heard on the air.

Broadcasting on FM 95.7 and AM 1330, Ke Buena is the first truly local Spanish-language commercial radio station in the Northwest Interior, but not the first of its kind. radio station in Spokane. From 2014 to 2016, KMBI broadcast in Spanish – coincidentally on the same frequency as Ke Buena – with content sourced from its nonprofit owner, Moody Bible Institute. KMBI eventually became the rock station KYOZ, or OZ 95.7, but when that station closed in June 2020, it opened the door to new ownership and a new format.

Ke Beuna is a mix of locally produced and subscribed shows. On weekends, for example, Cárdenas welcomes La Voz del Pueblo, or “La Voix du Peuple”, from 10 am to 11 am. It is co-sponsored by two local awareness-raising organizations, Mujeres in Action (Women in Action) and the Comunidad Cristiana de Spokane Church (Christian Community of Spokane). A third of an hour is also available – free of charge – to local organizations, such as Latinos en Spokane and Spokane Association of Hispanic Business Professionals, whose message is aimed at the Spanish-speaking community.

After Cárdenas’ morning show on weekdays, Ke Buena fills the airwaves with subscribed shows. MLC Media The Numero Uno 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. is predominantly contemporary Mexican music, while from 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Hispanic artist Oswaldo Diaz plays three radio personalities for Entravision’s popular comedy show called Erazno and La Chokolata.

During the day, listeners within about 60 miles of the Spokane transmitter should be able to hear both FM and AM broadcasts, which are also available online at kebuena957.com. At night, Ke Buena’s AM signal and coverage drop about 10 miles in all directions.

Click to enlarge Cárdenas (left) and La Voz del Pueblo co-host Luis Hernandez - YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Photo of young Kwak

Cárdenas (left) and La Voz del Pueblo co-host Luis Hernandez

Bbefore launching Ke Buena, Reed says the research has revealed a growing Spanish-speaking market in the Northwest Interior. Census data, reports from Nielsen and other sources suggest that potentially 50,000 people within listening range of Ke Buena speak Spanish, says Reed, who grew up in Spanish in Arizona.

In many Latinx communities, radio is culturally more important than in other communities, says Reed.

“It has the same appeal as it did with the Anglos 40-50 years ago,” says Reed, who hosted a radio show while living in Argentina, and lived, taught, and graduated in theology while living in Argentina. living in Mexico, where he retains dual nationality.

“His Spanish is perfect,” Cárdenas says with awe of Reed, whom he met in 2015 when Cárdenas was DJing at a Tri-Cities station known as La Ley.

Then like today, the two men are better known by their nicknames. The reed is El Chupacabra, the mythical creature believed to suck blood (chupa) from cattle, including goats (cabras).

Cárdenas’s nickname has also been the name of his radio shows: Pichakuas, a word beyond the capabilities of Google Translate (and this writer).

Luckily, we meet at Marando’s Bar & Restaurant, where Cárdenas and a few friends await the start of the FIFA World Cup qualifiers between USA and Mexico (USA won the game). Marando co-owner Mario Ruiz provides assistance: As Cárdenas makes a jumping motion with his hand, Ruiz explains that pichakuas relates to a happy bird.

Cárdenas earned the nickname of foreman in the apple orchards of central Washington, where he had worked in the mid-1980s. He had hoped to earn enough money to return to Mexico, but instead found his voice as an advocate. Spanish speakers and culture.

He paraded with activist Cesar Chavez (Martin Luther King is another of his idols) and got involved in local radio, first as a volunteer, then as a paid DJ in 1991 with KDNA at Tri -Cities. He worked in several other stations, including La Reyna. And he talked about the treatment of undocumented workers.

“Some people are afraid to speak in public,” Cárdenas says, “but I like it.”

Thus, every morning of the week, he rises well before dawn to greet the listeners on El Show de Pichakuas, from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. It plays music and reads the weather, traffic and local headlines. He also shares a daily motivational read.

“That’s my favorite thing,” Cárdenas says. “I like helping people, raising them.” ??


Source link

]]>
CCU Student-Run Radio Station Soaks Up Orlando ‘Dream Come True’ Experience | News https://lkrlt.org/ccu-student-run-radio-station-soaks-up-orlando-dream-come-true-experience-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/ccu-student-run-radio-station-soaks-up-orlando-dream-come-true-experience-news/ Amid the controlled chaos of Coastal Carolina celebrating their first bowl in program history at Exploria Stadium in Orlando on Friday night were members of the school’s radio station, WCCU Radio. Throughout the fall, students at WCCU Radio, the university’s student-run radio network, have called up CCU’s home football and basketball games. With the Chants […]]]>

Amid the controlled chaos of Coastal Carolina celebrating their first bowl in program history at Exploria Stadium in Orlando on Friday night were members of the school’s radio station, WCCU Radio.

Throughout the fall, students at WCCU Radio, the university’s student-run radio network, have called up CCU’s home football and basketball games. With the Chants in Orlando, Jeff Ranta, the station’s educational advisor, didn’t expect the crew to make the trip.

“We thought we would probably have the chance to cover the Myrtle Beach Bowl at [Brooks Stadium]”, remembers Ranta.

Then the exact opposite happened. The Myrtle Beach Bowl was full, but the Cure Bowl had extended the invitation to go downstairs.

“It was even a Hail Mary email for getting here,” said Natalie Corson, senior program director for WCCU Radio. “And when we had the chance, we knew we had to jump on it.”

Corson said she was thrilled her team was able to attend, especially all the work she and others have done to make WCCU Radio a more recognizable name on campus.

“Most people don’t even know we have a radio station,” Corson said. “When I arrived it was one of my goals. This was one of my goals as an intern last semester, but coming back as a program director this year, it was really one of my goals to keep going and making sure people do it. know.

After the formation of the Coastal Carolina Communication, Media and Culture Department in 2008, WCCU Radio began. The radio station allows students to create, produce and host their own radio show at a time slot that suits them. A student’s show can be a solo endeavor or a group effort and can discuss a variety of topics from sports and music to current affairs.

With the opportunity the radio team had in Orlando, Corson wanted the students to know what the team had done there.

“I don’t want this to go unnoticed,” Corson said.






WCCU in Orlando 02

Natalie Corson, Senior Program Director, is working ahead of the 2021 Tailgreeter Cure Bowl in Orlando on December 17. Photo courtesy of WCCU Radio.



Along with Ranta and Corson, other team members included Dr James Abdallah, Senior Director and WCCU Radio Director for Sports Broadcasting, TJ O’Sullivan; Ramsey Cook, the station manager; and sophomore play-by-play announcer Bennett Ferguson. Ferguson, who dabbled in radio a bit when he was in high school, said that while he didn’t have the experience of his peers, he took full advantage of the opportunity that Ranta said Ferguson won. .


Source link

]]>
Indigenous radio station celebrates 50 years of programming https://lkrlt.org/indigenous-radio-station-celebrates-50-years-of-programming/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 22:35:00 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/indigenous-radio-station-celebrates-50-years-of-programming/ WINNIPEG – It is 6 p.m. on a Friday night and the call lines for one of Canada’s largest native radio stations are all flashing. This will be the case for the next four hours as hundreds of listeners across Manitoba try to catch NCI FM’s flagship show called “Friends on Fridays”. The on-demand broadcast […]]]>

WINNIPEG –

It is 6 p.m. on a Friday night and the call lines for one of Canada’s largest native radio stations are all flashing.

This will be the case for the next four hours as hundreds of listeners across Manitoba try to catch NCI FM’s flagship show called “Friends on Fridays”.

The on-demand broadcast began in 2004 and is a staple in many Indigenous homes. Some listeners wait more than a year just before sending a special cry to their loved ones.

“Basically it’s like winning the lottery. The cousins ​​brag all the time. It’s a level of love for the show that has totally blown the community away,” said Davey Gott, the one of the show’s co-hosts.

Any Friday night, listeners can hear song requests, yelling at “cuzzins” in other communities, or stories of big bingo wins. The heart of the program, like the station on which it is broadcast, is to represent the daily life of Indigenous communities.

NCI FM celebrates 50 years of connecting and advocating for parts of the province that are not often included in the mainstream media.

“You can listen to it and you hear some language, but it’s also about community. You hear people you might know. You hear community names and you hear stories that you can also relate to. identify, “says David McLeod, the station’s general manager.

Native Communications Inc. or NCI was founded in the fall of 1971 in northern Manitoba. At the time, the media scene was booming in the town of Thompson, but McLeod says there was a “biased” portrayal of Indigenous peoples.

A group of northern Indigenous communities decided to form a committee to create a station that would offer programming in Indigenous language and culture, which then became NCI, McLeod says.

Part of it included carrying messages to those working in the field, says Sydney McKay, original board member and former NCI broadcaster.

“People had to send messages to trappers, hunters and fishermen, and have a one-way communication system,” he recalls.

McKay was living in Thompson when, at age 21, he was asked to sit on the NCI board of directors.

“It was an honor. It was right in the middle of something new. It wasn’t done in the North at that time, not in the native language.”

McKay and his co-host, Arnold Dysart, would record shows using a single microphone on a folding table. NCI bought airtime from local radio stations and broadcast half-hour shows featuring music and content in Cree. It then expanded to include religious programs and interviews with indigenous politicians and leaders.

The main growth of the station came in the 1990s when it started purchasing transmitters to broadcast its own content. NCI officially aired in Winnipeg in the fall of 1998.

McLeod says she now operates 57 transmitters reaching almost every corner of the province.

“We are venturing into communities that commercial radio does not pay attention to. This is something that is at the heart of what we do.”

Originally from the Chemawawin Cree Nation, about 440 kilometers north of Winnipeg, Gott has been with the station for about three years. Some of her earliest memories include NCI playing in the background while her grandmother made banique in their home community.

“NCI is like the sound of the house. It’s like the community theme, ”says Gott.

The station’s other full programming includes “Metis Hour x 2,” a two-hour show hosted by Métis music legend Ray St. Germain; the Aboriginal Music Countdown, a Cree country program; and weekly bingo games.

Roz McIvor, from Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation, is the voice of the “Aboriginal Music Countdown” and afternoon driving program. She says NCI hosts connect with audiences in ways not seen on other stations, as they understand the complex challenges many communities face.

“NCI is a really safe place for everyone to forget all the bad and bad things in their life, and just have fun on air with their favorite music.”

McLeod says the station’s future includes a push to expand its online reach to urban audiences, but he notes that the heart of what it does will never change.

“Indigenous communities want to get along and want to connect, and I think the radio will always be there.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on December 21, 2021


Source link

]]>
Necessary checks at Kaimahi checkpoint https://lkrlt.org/necessary-checks-at-kaimahi-checkpoint/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 20:33:12 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/necessary-checks-at-kaimahi-checkpoint/ Photo: Getty Images. Adam gifford Wally Haumaha: Necessary checks at Kaimahi checkpoint Click for the full interview. The police defend the control of the iwi volunteers working at the checkpoints in the direction of Te Taitokerau. There was tension between the groups yesterday after some volunteers were turned away because no checks were made to […]]]>

Photo: Getty Images.

Adam gifford

Wally Haumaha: Necessary checks at Kaimahi checkpoint

Click for the full interview.

The police defend the control of the iwi volunteers working at the checkpoints in the direction of Te Taitokerau.

There was tension between the groups yesterday after some volunteers were turned away because no checks were made to see if they had criminal convictions.

Deputy Commissioner Wally Haumaha said legislation allowing police to use volunteers was only passed last week and included a requirement that people delegated to enforce health orders be vetted and trained.

He says the relationship with iwi in the north has been built over many years and the issue is a minor issue that can be resolved.

“Screening is an important part of reassuring those going through checkpoints, and I think people would expect us to set certain parameters regarding who we allow to work with us,” Haumaha said. .

The first day of the checkpoint went well, with only a few cars turned back because the occupants could not show they were doubly vaccinated or had a recent negative Covid test.



Source link

]]>
Rosalía to host a show on GTA Online radio station https://lkrlt.org/rosalia-to-host-a-show-on-gta-online-radio-station/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 18:45:26 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/rosalia-to-host-a-show-on-gta-online-radio-station/ Rosalia is part of the Rockstar Games family after joining their new GTA Online radio station, MOTOMAMI Los Santos. Spanish singer and songwriter to host alongside longtime Rockstar collaborator Arca. MOTOMAMI Los Santos pays tribute to Rosalía’s upcoming album and plays songs from Papa Yankee, Mr. Fingers, Aventura, etc. According to Hypebeat, Rockstar Games has […]]]>

Rosalia is part of the Rockstar Games family after joining their new GTA Online radio station, MOTOMAMI Los Santos. Spanish singer and songwriter to host alongside longtime Rockstar collaborator Arca.

MOTOMAMI Los Santos pays tribute to Rosalía’s upcoming album and plays songs from Papa Yankee, Mr. Fingers, Aventura, etc. According to Hypebeat, Rockstar Games has revealed that Radio Los Santos will be playing new music from Hit-Boy, Freddie Gibbs with Pusha T, TiaCorine, Rich the Kid, Offset, and Mozzy with YG, Saweetie, Future, Tyler, The Creator, and Kodak Black, and more.

© Getty Images

The Barcelona native’s new album includes a teaser showing Rosalía covered in red glitter and a clip from Motomami title track. The long-awaited album comes after Rosalía’s breakthrough in 2018, El Mal Querer.

Recently, the singer shared on social media that she got a parking ticket, claiming that she only parked on site for “five minutes.” “Con Altura” singer stopped by the Miami Desing neighborhood to take selfies next to a hand-painted sidewalk, announcing her upcoming album Motomami, which will arrive in 2022.

If the 28-year-old wishes to defend herself and herself, she can request a court hearing within 90 days of the date of issuance of the summons.

Fortunately for the native of Barcelona, ​​if she has to travel to another state or country to continue working at Motomami, she will be able to make a payment online, by mail or by phone.

Sign up for our newsletter to stay in touch with your culture. Get the latest news on your celebrities, royals, and the best beauty, fashion and lifestyle news straight to your inbox!


Source link

]]>
South Sudanese intelligence service shuts down community radio station https://lkrlt.org/south-sudanese-intelligence-service-shuts-down-community-radio-station/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 09:01:12 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/south-sudanese-intelligence-service-shuts-down-community-radio-station/ Major General Gregory Deng Kuac, Deputy Director General of the General Intelligence Office of the National Security Service (NSS) On Friday evening, the South Sudanese National Security Service stormed Singata FM, the community radio station in Kapoeta town, eastern Equatoria state, and forcibly shut it down. According to eyewitnesses and station staff, heavily armed security […]]]>

Major General Gregory Deng Kuac, Deputy Director General of the General Intelligence Office of the National Security Service (NSS)

On Friday evening, the South Sudanese National Security Service stormed Singata FM, the community radio station in Kapoeta town, eastern Equatoria state, and forcibly shut it down.

According to eyewitnesses and station staff, heavily armed security guards wore padlocks to lock studios and offices and ordered staff to turn off all computers and exit the compound without giving reasons.

Station manager Evelyn Losike told Radio Tamazuj that none of her employees had been tortured or arrested and wondered why they had been closed because they had not broken any laws.

“It has nothing to do with ethics because we are a private press house, it is our right. They came in large numbers and surrounded the radio station, ”Losike said. “I was away and found a lot of padlocks on the studio and the desks. They found the staff editing the news. They just told them to stop what they were doing, shut down their computers and asked them to stop the station and they shut it down.

She said the radio was shut down by order of the state Information Minister who claims to have evidence of wrongdoing and that the station manager and general manager were ordered to go to Torit and to meet the governor of the state, General Louis Lobong.

“We have no problem with the government, the only thing is that we didn’t have a slot for the International University of Equatoria when they came (October 15) to assess the place (the station) and wanted a talk -show and I told them I can give them between 5-7 p.m. which is free but they refused, “Losike explained.” They wanted us to force them into a niche occupied by the company coalition civilian for a talk show about natural resources, I told them it was difficult to cancel because it was already paid for.

She added: “I resisted and that was the only problem. They said I was going beyond government. These people came with the governor so they said I had no respect and a lot of things. This is the problem. “

Ngoya Yaba, a civil society activist in Kapoeta, said he was dismayed at what he called an attack on the community by only closing the media house in the area and called on the government to reopen the radio station on which the community relies for information.

“It is a great shame for us as young people and civil society activists in Greater Kapoeta. It shocked us when we learned that the radio had been closed and that it was the only radio that provided information to the whole community of Kapoeta, ”Yaba said. “This is not a very good action taken against the community since it is a community radio station, the only access to the media that has helped them for all this time.”

He added: “My request is to let them reopen the radio, to let the people of the great Kapoeta continue with the normal services that Singata FM has provided them. “

Efforts to reach the state’s information minister for comment were unsuccessful as he did not answer his phone.

comments

comments


Source link

]]>
Jon Town of Phoenix radio station KBACH bids farewell after 51 years https://lkrlt.org/jon-town-of-phoenix-radio-station-kbach-bids-farewell-after-51-years/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 13:01:20 +0000 https://lkrlt.org/jon-town-of-phoenix-radio-station-kbach-bids-farewell-after-51-years/ Jon Town worked in radio for 51 years, the last 20 at the KBAQ in Phoenix. When someone who has been doing their job for decades ends up hanging up, two questions spring to mind. Why did you stay so long? And why did you leave? “I locked myself at the door,” Town joked. In […]]]>

Jon Town worked in radio for 51 years, the last 20 at the KBAQ in Phoenix. When someone who has been doing their job for decades ends up hanging up, two questions spring to mind.

Why did you stay so long? And why did you leave?

“I locked myself at the door,” Town joked.

In fact, Town, who hosted the weekdays “Classical Happy Hour” on KBACH, as the station is known, had been planning his retirement for some time. This is something he discussed with Marty Manning, a longtime voice on KEZ 99.9 radio, who retired in 2019.

“We’re going back a long way,” Town said. “He and I talked about it years ago, about ‘When are you going to retire?’ He said, “Well, I have a plan and here it is,” and he held on to it and walked away. I did the same. At that point, I wanted to be retired and just decided to do it.

Why Jon Town left KBACH

Town left the station on November 30. He will spend more time with his wife Lynn, he said, and devote more time to hobbies like welding, photography and Formula 1 racing.

“The knowledge of classical music and Jon’s calming presence has for many years been an essential part of bringing KBACH listeners home,” Matt Rogers, the station’s program director, said in a statement. “Jon will be missed by both listeners and colleagues. We wish him the best of retirement.

Greg Kostraba now hosts “Classical Happy Hour”.

It was a good race – and unlikely in some ways.

“It was a complete path for me,” Town said. “I did pop, country, whatever you want. And when I had the chance to do that, I thought okay, I know classical music a bit, but not a lot. And my friend Sterling Beeaff said, “We’re looking for someone to work part-time, would you be interested? “

It was. So began the learning curve.

“You have to learn something new every day,” Town said. “When you walk in and you’re like, ‘Actually, I have no idea what I’m talking about,’ I guess I’d better understand that. It turned out to be incredibly interesting. These years have passed in haste.

How the pandemic changed being a classic radio DJ

Beeaff retired earlier in 2021. Town then stuck with his own plans, which the COVID-19 pandemic may have accelerated.

“It was part of it,” he said. “The pandemic has certainly thrown a wrench in it. “

Until a recent visit to the KBACH offices, Town had not been there for almost a year and a half, he said. For people who communicate for a living, this kind of isolation can be difficult.

“I really like being at the radio station, seeing other people at the station,” he said. “Being in a closet for a few hours to record a show was more difficult than it seems. It’s like, ‘OK, I’m sitting here staring at the walls.’ “

It wasn’t like that when he was in the KBACH studio.

“Before, between pieces of music, I would walk around, ‘Hi, how are you’, blah blah blah,” he said. “Plus, you could see out the studio window and see what was going on.”

The transition has weighed on him, Town said.

“The dynamics are completely different,” he said. “You can try to kid yourself, you don’t, but we’re in the kind of business where we sort of thrive on interacting with people. “

Classical music is such a specific genre that its appeal is often very concentrated. But Town said he believes the pandemic may have drawn more people into classical music.

“You have to have a taste for it,” Town said. “Although I will say this – when the pandemic hit, people were listening longer all the time. It relaxed them.

He was happy to provide this service.

“I talk to listeners who were like, ‘I never liked classical music, but I love it now because of it. And I use it that way, but not all the time, ”he said. “So we were there for them, whenever they needed a dose.”

How broadcasting has changed since Town debuted

Town began working at Phoenix Radio in 1982. Before coming to Arizona, he worked everywhere, including Tulsa, Denver, Dallas, and San Antonio.

The profession has changed over the years.

“Probably the biggest difference is that I started playing vinyl, then four-track cassette carts, CDs and finally digital,” Town said. “I was editing by cutting with a razor blade and splicing with duct tape. “

Odds pressure has always been a reality, but it’s more concentrated now, he said. The fragmentation of all media has also resulted in greater competition. “So the pressure is on you all the time,” he said.

No more. He leaves with many years, but few regrets.

“I really like it.”

Contact Goodykoontz at bill.goodykoontz@arizonarepublic.com. Facebook: facebook.com/GoodyOnFilm. Twitter: @goodyk.

Thank you for subscribing. This premium content is made possible by your continued support of local journalism.



Source link

]]>